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Student voices should be the loudest ones in your head.

Student voices should be the loudest ones in your head.

Too often, teachers are making choices about instruction and content delivery without truly thinking of their students. But, why is that happening? Shouldn’t all teachers be basing their lessons almost entirely on the needs of their students? Student voices should be the loudest ones in your head as you’re planning.

This podcast, by #MichEd host Brad Wilson, highlights what students want, what they’re looking for in school, and what makes them learn best. The majority of students discussed hands-on learning. This type of learning keeps students engaged, interested, and willing to do the work. They need the stimulation in order to retain and understand content. Students also talked about making choices. They want to make choices about topics they work with, pacing of content, peers they are in a group with, and how they demonstrate their knowledge. Isn’t this what teachers have been recently trying to push in the field of education? Why haven’t we just been listening to students?

One of the main points that I found so interesting is that students know how they learn best. As teachers, we shouldn’t take this away from them. We want our students to be skilled in metacognition and self-awareness. If our students understand themselves enough to know how they learn, then we need to let them learn in that way. Now, I know its near impossible in a classroom to let each student learn exactly how they want everyday, but the alternative is not to teach how we want to everyday instead. Teachers should be taking into account the learning styles of students and giving them the opportunity to learn in the way they learn best as often as possible. If the majority of your class consists of hands-on, visual learners, the majority of your lessons should be hands-on and visual. Give students options. They are capable of making decisions and should be encouraged to do so. The podcast highlights many students who know exactly how they learn, and who even noted that other students learn differently from them. If students have choices of how to receive content, we can engage so many more students than by forcing them to learn how we think they should learn.

After all, our whole job is for them. Teaching is all about the student. Their voices should be the loudest we hear.

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Let’s talk about the good, not the bad.

Recently, I’ve found myself, along with the teachers I’m surrounded by, focusing more on the behavioral issues with my students than on their education. My students seem to just want to misbehave. Maybe it’s the time of the year. Maybe it’s the extra long winter. Or, maybe, they’ve just had enough of everyone yelling at them. 

It’s not so much that the teachers want to get these kids in trouble. It’s that the students have made it nearly impossible to teach. The entire staff has pretty much reached the end of their patience with the students. But, clearly, the “trouble” approach hasn’t gotten very far. In the past two weeks, I’ve been trying to reward the little things with my students. Like all classrooms, I have the students who are just always problems. Granted, these kids are usually my favorites. They just have too much energy for a classroom. 

Instead of scolding these students for talking, I’ve been trying to subtly reinforce their good behavior. Many times, this means that I pull them aside during work time and tell them that I appreciate how they’ve been doing. One student who is probably one of the most talkative has been showing more effort toward his work and participating more in class. During warm-ups this past week, he was asking questions about the material and if he was doing the work right (which he was). This is impressive because, since I’ve been there, I don’t think he’s done one full warm-up problem. I told him that I really appreciated that he had been working so hard with the material and paying more attention. He wouldn’t admit that he had been trying, but it was clear to me. 

I’ve done this with a few other students, both with similar behavioral issues and without. I think that it’s so important to keep reinforcing students for their hard work, good behavior, and success in the classroom. I find that this works so much more to control student behavior. Students are much more likely to behave when they’re being reinforced for good behavior. Especially if they know how much the teacher cares about them. No one wants to disappoint anyone who cares about them, so students will work hard to do their best for you. So, I’ve been trying really hard to give positive reinforcement to all my students. In some cases, I may be the only person who tells a student that they’re proud of them. And that’s a big deal. I’m so proud of all of my students, all for different reasons. I think they deserve to know that. 

Ask Questions!

Ask-The-Right-Questions-

One of the most important things I’ve found in teaching so far is the importance of asking meaningful questions to deepen mathematical understanding. I want my students to be mathematical thinkers and to be able to discuss their thinking with me and with their peers. I think that so much of mathematics education has focused on answers and procedures. Instead of that, I want to instill in my students the idea that the journey to get to answers, the thinking, is what doing math is all about. That’s what is important. 

At my latest observation, I asked my coordinator, Jon, to focus on the questions I was asking students and how they can influence the thinking of my students. I wanted to analyze how well my questions were actually inspiring thinking within my students and if I could be more effective at this. 

One of the main realizations we had was how often I was starting questions with “why?” That was even the whole question a lot of times. Though this is a good start to the way I want students to be thinking, it comes off as a bit aggressive. Jon talked about how there are genuine questions we can ask as teachers and how these are often more effective. For example, we ask a lot of questions like “what is the distance formula?” for repetition purposes, but these aren’t genuine questions. We know the answer. Instead, a genuine question would be “how did you think about that?” We don’t know how our students’ thought processes work and having them explain it is what I would want my ideal student to be able to do– to explain, in detail, how they thought about the math involved. 

Another idea we came across was the issue of how to reword questions when students are not responding well. When my students struggled with the answer, it was hard for me to reword it in a different enough way to get them to understand. Then, for time management purposes, I would often give them or lead them into answers that I wanted them to discover or illustrate to me themselves. Having ideas for multiple questions before the lesson will help me to get students to understand what I’m asking. This will take a lot of planning, but will definitely be worth it. 

My final “grow” moment from this lesson was about addressing student misconceptions. When students come up with ideas that are incorrect, but common (and understandable), I have a hard time knowing how to respond. I know that saying “no” in any part of my response is something I don’t want to do. This has a lot to do with my opinion that students who hear the word “no” will shut down and not listen to any of the rest of my response. For example, in this particular lesson, I had asked students which side was the hypotenuse and how they knew. One of my students responded and said “I know that side is the hypotenuse because it’s the one that’s diagonal.” My response in the moment was “yeah, but, actually, it doesn’t always have to be. We know it’s the hypotenuse because it’s across from the right angle.” I immediately regretted saying the “yeah, but…” part because I don’t want my students to be confused. Jon and I talked about saying something like “that’s really interesting! Let’s look at this,” showing them an example of something that disproves their idea. In this way, we are not shooting students down, not giving them incorrect ideas, and clearing up misconceptions (that much of the class shared.) 

Now what? 

In the future, I want to be conscious of the ideas that we discussed. Firstly, I want to change my question starters and begin asking more genuine questions. I think my students will really respond better to questions about their thinking, rather than “why?” Why questions seem to be looking for the mathematically correct answer of why, which isn’t my goal at all. So, I want to focus more on the goal I have and which questions seem to be getting there. Second, I want to plan, plan, plan. I want to plan multiple questions that address the big ideas of the lesson and how to get students to be able to answer them. This will take practice and experience, but I’m enthusiastic to start trying. Last, I want to spend a minute or two actually addressing misconceptions. I don’t want to just tell them why something is wrong, I want to show them. I want my students to see exactly why the hypotenuse is not always the diagonal line in order to better understand and retain that information. I think all of these things will help me to increase the mathematical thinking of my students. ‘Cause, after all, it’s the journey that’s important, right?